Monday, August 3, 2009

Since you asked....

Awhile back I had a possible theft issue in my store. On three separate occasions money was missing and it was very suspicious looking. They were all even amounts and the deposit slips for the bank were just a little fishy...

After a little more investigating and more digging with the bank (like the 5th call) we found out.... it was the BANK'S fault! Whaaaaaaat? I was so mad. It made me feel like I didn't do my homework, but when I called the bank the first time the money WAS missing. After we have a conversation with the associate (and basically try to get her to admit it) we find out from the bank it was their fault.

I. felt. awful.

I mean, it wasn't my fault and I did what I had to do. Ultimately, if the associate wouldn't have written in the wrong cash amount on the deposit slip all of this would have been avoided, but I still felt like poo...

Maybe I just wanted her leave? I honestly don't know anymore. She's a headache and sometimes hard to take, but I think her heart is in the right place. Most of the time.

This associate and I are working on her math skills because they're awful. She knows she's not good at math, but sometimes I don't think she cares! In this industry, you have to be able to crunch numbers! It's absolutely necessary.

I really want to suggest she take math courses at our local community college, but I'm worried about how she's going to take that. I'm also worried that if her employer (me) suggests that she take a math course (that costs money) she could come back later and sue us for the costs of the class. I know I'm being a little paranoid here, but we all know how "sue-happy" this country is. We have to watch our backs!

Bottom line, I don't have time to teach her basic math but I don't have time to keep fixing her mistakes either. My gut is telling me that I need to invest this time in her and try to teach her math. I just know that if I'm going to do this... it's going to be on my own time. Oy.

This is a girl that is pretty young, that I hired three years ago as an associate and promoted to lower level management last October and into assistant management in February. Basically, she's someone that I took under my wing a long time ago but things have changed in the past 6 months... She's young, and we change A TON around this age... but I'm feeling torn on what the right thing to do is.

My biggest pet peeve is investing time and money into people just so they can go work for someone else... maybe I should have a little more faith...

What would you guys do?

I know, I know, you don't have many details, b/c this is very confidential... but I'm just curious. I get the feeling I already know what most of you will say.... ;)

PS : My computer just made a rooster sound at me... Ummmm, ok? "Kakadoodledoooooooo!!" I have no idea why and I have never heard it before. Weird. Silly Mac.

6 comments:

Crazy Shenanigans said...

Hmm, I would feel bad but at the same time it's her own fault that she got questioned because of her bad math skills. I would try to teach her some basic math or suggest she get a book on it.

You can only do so much and if she doesn't care most of the time then you have to decide how much more to invest.

Amber (Girl with the red hair) said...

Maybe you can just hint nicely to her that if she wants to continue moving up in this position/job then it would be useful to consider taking a course at the local college!?

Shoshanah said...

Its amazing how some people can get by without basic math skills in life. I do realize I majored in math so I do have an advantage there. But that also means I was tutoring throughout college and math skills. And when you're in college and you never learned algebra, or you have to use your fingers to add 8+7. I don't understand how so much people don't seem to think its important to actually understand what they learn in school

I know there's some companies that will pay for their employees to further their education. I'm guess that since you're working at a mall store, they probably don't have that type of an arrangement.

A Little Pink... said...

I don't think any company should pay for an employee to learn basic math... and I would never expect them to. It really is sad... I feel bad for her because she does know she's lacking in that area and that her math skills are what's holding her back. It's basic formulas that I cannot seem to get her to memorize. And when I say basic, I mean really basic. Such as percentages. Maybe I'm just not good a teacher!! ?? Kudos to you Shoshanah for tutoring math because I just don't have the patience, I want to bonk them on the head and say, "why don't you get it??" lol

Alexandra Bahou said...

I know you feel bad, but you had to question her. It's a place of business, so people can't take things too personally.

I would maybe suggest taking a math course. I know you may think you're being offensive, but she really is going to need it later in life.

If she can't afford it, maybe there is a volunteer organization that could help her with her skills. It's nice that you want to try and teach her, but that may cause more frustration in the workplace...you know?

Hope things work out! :)

Lesli said...

I want my Mac to make cock-a-doodle-doo sounds! I think a basic, general math class is in order for your employee. It would be to her benefit to sharpen her skills so she can go further up on the career ladder. Yes, she should pay for it herself if she is serious about doing her job better! Basic math skills (as much as math sucks) are a part of every job and just day-to-day living.